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Scones with Chorizo, Parmesan and Asparagus

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Bodybuilders like good food. Good food means healthy food but even the strongest personalities sometimes crave for an illegal donut. Let’s debunk the myth of perfect people once again with me and a scone.

Back in September, my friend Tahny published a recipe for Caramel Apple Bacon Scones. Since that time the recipe was sitting in my cooking file waiting to be used. It sounds so good that I wasn’t brave enough to use it – once you are on the path of making scones or any kind of sweet treat, you are on the path to unlimited indulgence. At least this is the case with me.

But today I really felt like baking and I was inspired by parmesan & black pepper scones at Songbird café in Ann Arbor, where I and my desperately eager to do creative writing fellows meet on Sunday. I liked the idea to have a savory scone.

I’ve got truly excellent staff in my fridge such as chorizo (Spanish sausage) from Zingerman’s, parmesan, asparagus (I recently cooked Asian style salad with tofu and asparagus) and sun-dried tomatoes. All these ingredients are among my favorite.

I lately have a huge taste for asparagus.  And I am not the only one who is in love with this vegetable. In one of my favorite visual and extremely creative reads The Modern Art Cookbook, a book on how modern artists and writers eat, cook, depict and write about food, amidst the cornucopia of life in the kitchen and in the studio there is a place for asparagus as well. Marcel Proust, who according to Daily Rituals: How Artists Work, primarily lived off just two (sometimes one) croissants and two bowls of café au lait a day and dined only occasionally, writes about his observation of asparagus in Swann’s Way: In Search of Lost Time, Vol. 1 (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition):

“[…] but what fascinated me would be the asparagus, tingled with ultramarine and rosy pink which ran from their heads, finely stippled in mauve and azure, through a series of imperceptible changes to their white feet, still stained a little by the soil of their garden bed: a rainbow-loveliness that was not of this world. I felt that these celestial hues indicated the presence of exquisite creatures who had been pleased to assume vegetable form, who, through the disguise which covered their firm and edible flesh, allowed me to discern in this radiance of earliest down, these hinted rainbow, these blue evening shades, that precious quality which I should recognize again when, all night long after dinner at which I had partaken of them, they played (lyrical and coarse in their jesting as the fairies in Shakespeare’s Dream) at transforming my humble chamber into a bower of aromatic perfume. ”

Georgia O’Keeffe gives her own recipe for Wild Asparagus:

“1 bunch (around 12 ounces/350 g) wild or cultivated asparagus
Butter or oil, to taste or for sautèeing
Herb salt and freshly ground pepper

Wash the asparagus carefully to remove all fine sand. Cut the woody part of the stems off, keeping the asparagus in ling pieces. This tender, young asparagus can be steamed or sautéed.”

Edouard Manet painted Bunch of Asparagus in 1880

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Scones with Chorizo, Parmesan and Asparagus

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Scones

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1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Line a cookie sheet with parchment or a silicone mat.
2. Sift together the flour, corn flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and pepper together in a medium bowl.
3. Add the cold cubed butter and work it in the flour with either your finger tips or use a pastry blender or the fork and knife method. Mix until the flour resembled moist gravel.
4. Add, the chorizo, parmesan, asparagus, chili pepper, and sun-dried tomatoes. Toss gently trying not to over mix.
5. Pour in the milk tossing just to moisten the flour. Empty the bowl onto the counter top and gently knead just to gather the flour into one mass. Divide the dough into two. Shape into 2 circles about 1 inch thick. Brush with an egg wash.
6. Cut into triangles. You should get 8 triangle per circle. Place on the baking sheet and bake until set and lightly golden, about 11 minutes.

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Inspirations for future cooking:

Spring Vegetable Risotto

Glazed Salmon
Labneh Recipe
Kale Rice Bowl Recipe
Burrata Cheese with Tomato Salsa and Olive Salsa
Healthy Taco Dip
Blackberry Mango Fruit Leather
Fennel & Leek Soup
Baby Artichoke Antipasta
Apple, Pecan and Gorgonzola Salad with Honey Mustard Balsamic Vinaigrette

2 Comments

  1. Beautifully done! I’m ironically making scones today! Carrot cake scone with a cream cheese drizzle! But, I might change that idea based on these delicious looking scones you have made. YUM! I wish I had some asparagus! I am flattered.

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